About

 

Design

The house was designed by architect William Nicholson and built in 1976 as one of several experimental domed buildings using new materials. It was constructed by spraying shotcrete onto steel rebar and wire mesh frames over inflated aeronautical balloons. It has approximately 2,700 square feet of living space including three bedrooms, one accessed via a spiral staircase inspired by an icecream cone that at the top is the same diameter as the room, and two bathrooms, and has a two-car garage. All the interior surfaces are rounded, and the master bathroom has a floor of rocks instead of tiles. Originally off-white in color, the house was repainted deep orange in 2000 and one of the domes was later painted purple.

 
 
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Nicknames

The house is known popularly as "The Flintstone House", from The Flintstones, a Hanna-Barbera Productions animated cartoon series of the early 1960s about a Stone Agefamily. It is also known as the Dome House, the Gumby House, the Worm Casting House, the Bubble House, and "The Barbapapa House", from Barbapapa, a character and series of books created by Annette Tison and Talus Taylor in the 1970s.

 
 
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Disrepair, restoration and remodeling

By the mid-1980s the house had fallen into disrepair, as water runoff from higher on the mountainside damaged the foundation, causing the walls to crack. After failed attempts at sealing the cracks, it was extensively restored in 1987.

San Francisco Bay Area architect Eugene Tsui undertook to remodel the house during the first decade of the 2000s. The results of Tsui's remodel appear as the "Edises Kitchen" project, pictured on Tsui's website. Tsui's original concept for the remodel, including a proposed complementary second residence on the property, is detailed in depth on his earlier site.

In late 2017, new owners installed large oxidized steel sculptures of dinosaurs, a woolly mammoth, a giraffe, and Fred Flintstone in the yard.

 
 
 
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